Welcome to Help Astronomy projects

We are glad you have come to visit us! 

This page provides you with information about free-,open- astronomy projects. If you enjoy science, especially astronomy and/or want to contribute to it but don't know how... don't worry, we are here to help you. Please, read the information about projects below, decide which one seems more interesting to you, find the information how to participate in!

Feel free to ask us any question you want. You can do it on About Us.

Galaxies

Galaxy Zoo: Hubble uses gorgeous imagery of hundreds of thousands of galaxies drawn from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope archive. To understand how these galaxies, and our own, formed we need your help to classify them according to their shapes — a task at which your brain is better than even the most advanced computer. If you're quick, you may even be the first person in history to see each of the galaxies you're asked to classify. Read more...

Moon

Welcome to Moon Zoo — with your help, we hope to study the lunar surface in unprecedented detail. Thanks to the help of the Moon Zoo community we have already visually classified 1,872,397 images from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Read more about the LRO and Moon Zoo or learn how to take part.

We need your help to explore the lunar surface, by answering a series of questions about what you see. The most important thing to remember is that we've chosen tasks that are best done by humans rather than computer, so please don't spend much more than a minute on a any single image. Read more...

Solar Storm

Help them spot explosions on the Sun and track them across space to Earth. Your work will give astronauts an early warning if dangerous solar radiation is headed their way. And you could make a new scientific discovery.

Our solar scientists are really grateful for your help and in these short videos they talk about some of the big reasons why. Plus the Royal Observatory’s Becky Higgitt, Curator of the History of Science, reveals the long history of solar science at Greenwich. Read more...

NASA's Kepler spacecraft is one of the most powerful tools in the hunt for extrasolar planets. The Kepler team's computers are sifting through the data, but we at Planet Hunters are betting that there will be planets which can only be found via the remarkable human ability for pattern recognition.

This is a gamble, a bet if you will, on the ability of humans to beat machines just occasionally. It may be that no new planets are found or that computers have the job down to a fine art. And yet, it's just possible that you might be the first to know that a star somewhere out there in the Milky Way has a companion, just as our Sun does. Fancy giving it a try? Read more...

The Milky Way Project aims to sort and measure our galaxy, the Milky Way. Initially we're asking you to help us find and draw bubbles in beautiful infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope.

Understanding the cold, dusty material that we see in these images, helps scientists to learn how stars form and how our galaxy changes and evolves with time. Read more...

Star Dust

The interstellar dust particles returned to Earth by the Stardust mission are the first such pristine dust particles ever collected in space, and scientists are eager to "get their hands" on them. But first the particles have to be found! This will not be easy. We estimate that Stardust collected only around 45 interstellar dust particles. They are tiny—only about a micron (a millionth of a meter) in size! These miniscule particles are embedded in an aerogel collector 1,000 square centimeters in size. Finding them will be like searching for 45 ants on a football field while searching one 5 cm x 5 cm square at a time. Read more...

Be a Martian

Mars exploration is a civilization endeavor, no longer restricted to the interpid few, but to all who wish to share in the journey of discovery.

Help the NASA Be A Martian project create more detailed maps of Mars, and count and classify craters on Mars, from high-resolution images returned from Mars orbiters. Watch some videos to learn about why the project is mapping Mars and how to help. Read more...

 

Citizen Sky

Citizen Sky is a citizen science project providing you with a chance to do real scientific research. We are seeking to understand a star that has been a mystery to scientists for many years. This star is epsilon Aurigae, a very interesting, very bright star located in the constellation Auriga, the charioteer. This star is bright enough to be seen with the unaided eye even in the most light-polluted cities, and it is visible every fall, winter, and spring. Read more...

GLOBE at Night

With half of the world’s population now living in cities, many urban dwellers have never experienced the wonderment of pristinely dark skies and maybe never will. Light pollution is obscuring people’s long-standing natural heritage to view stars. The GLOBE at Night program is an international citizen-science campaign to raise public awareness of the impact of light pollution by encouraging everyone everywhere to measure local levels of night sky brightness and contribute observations online to a world map. All it takes is a few minutes to participate between 8-10 pm, March 22 through April 6. Your measurements will make a world of difference. Read More...